WELCOME TO MODELING 101!!!

There is more to the modeling world than the media lets on. If you want to find out what it really takes and how to manage your modeling career, then you've come to the right place! This blog is dedicated to the aspiring and already established models who live to defy the standards and stereotypes in order to make a place for themselves in this crazy industry.

Modeling 101 Followers - I Love You!!!

Follow Modeling 101 with Dania Denise by Email!

Google

Monday, June 28, 2010

Answering a Reader Question #83

Anonymous Wrote:

I understand commercial/print models need to have their own wardrobe for shoots, but do fashion/editorial models ever need to bring an outfit, shoes, or other clothing articles to gigs?
Thank you for all your advice! :) 


Hey, Anonymous! Thanks for the question and kind words--very much appreciated! When it comes to fashion/editorial models, there may be times when models are required to bring one or two items of their own for the shoot. However, most times the nature of these kinds of shoots have all those items covered (big budgets, top clients, large crew, etc.) so chances are the need to supply a shoot with your own stuff for editorial and fashion work will be minimal. It definitely varies from situation to situation--it's always best to be prepared for anything!

I do want to add that not all commercial/print models have to bring their own wardrobe/items to their shoots all the time. Regardless of the type of modeling one does, the decision as to whether a model needs to bring his/her own things solely depends on the nature of the shoot, who the client is, the size of the crew, etc. For example, if the client you are shooting for has a wardrobe stylist on the payroll (and a good budget to work with), they will do all the shopping for the shoot, which means the model will be off the hook (but even then they may ask you to bring a few things just in case--most times they don't even end up using your stuff but it's always best to be over prepared than under prepared). Smaller shoots that don't have a wardrobe stylist usually means the photographer/client will have to make the model responsible for the wardrobe since they do not have anyone assigned to oversee that part of the production.

In my experience, the one item I am regularly asked to bring are shoes. Or if it is a business themed shoot, they'll ask me to bring a nice, black suit jacket. So it varies but the items are definitely not the kind that will break your bank account.

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Answering a Reader Question #82

Anonymous Wrote: 


with which agency are you? 

I used to be with Ford's commercial/print division in San Francisco but I am now with Models, Inc., which has an office in San Francisco also but has its main office in Walnut Creek. It's a boutique agency.

Answering a Reader Question #81

Mahri Wrote:

Hi Dania! My name is Mahri and I am 14. I was just signed with Ford models and I am 5' 7. Does this mean that I am strictly going to be doing print/ commercial work? I really wanted to go to a higher level, such as high fashion, I know that is a long way off though :) and advice would be appreciated! 


Hi, Mahri! First off, congrats on getting signed, that's so awesome! Given your height you are ideal for commercial/print, which is where your agent will more than likely market you. However, if your look is one that their high fashion clients also like, then they will submit you for that type of work as well. Since you are still young, you still have time to grow and should you get lucky enough to reach 5'8" or taller then they will definitely cross you over into high fashion. If you want to know for sure how you will marketed, simply ask them. Make sure to mention your interest in high fashion and see what their feedback is. Your agent is your "go-to" person for these kinds of questions so definitely keep those lines of communication open and ask them anything you have on your mind about your career. They'll take care of you. =)

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Quick Update on Me June 2010

Wow, it's so nice to finally have some time to write an actual post on here! When it rains it pours and I have been super busy with a little bit of everything: painting murals, drawing comics, doing photoshoots, working on short films, editing manuscripts, etc.

With everything that's been going on I haven't had the chance to really sit down and write my modeling posts and I don't believe in rushing a post just for the sake of posting, you know? I have been answering reader questions and addressing reader comments but don't worry, I do have informational posts related to various modeling topics coming up very soon.

Soon as I get enough time to focus, I'll also bring you all up to date on my recent shoots and other projects that have been keeping me busy. Talk soon!


Feel free to continue sending questions my way...I love answering them!

Monday, June 14, 2010

Addressing a Reader Comment #3

Anonymous Wrote:

Way to rip this from eHow.com...you could've at least given credit/cited it, or not copy and pasted word-for-word. It's a great tutorial and you have an awesome example of your own, but you should give credit where it's due. 


 I'm sorry but I had to chuckle when I read your comment. If you looked at the eHow.com article in question a bit closer (How to Create Your Own Modeling Comp Cards), you would have seen that I am the author of it. I've been writing for eHow.com for a while now and the majority of my articles on there are related to modeling. I wrote this blog post first and then reused it for eHow.com.

So I guess I've got to give credit to myself! LOL...but thank you for being on your toes and pointing that out to me. I've had other readers alert me of when my content shows up somewhere unaccredited.

***I'm updating this post to let my readers know that eHow has completely changed and no longer has its Writers Program. As a result, I am no longer a contributing writer for eHow. They also no longer have writer profiles on their site so all of my information that used to be tied to the site and the articles on there no longer exists.***